Type

Tel Aviv film festival closes after violence

Tel Aviv’s Film Festival has closed following a violent demonstration in the capital.

The festival had been due to open on Wednesday.

The organizers said the violence erupted late Sunday night after a protest at the Tel Aviv Film Academy that turned violent, killing at least 11 people.

The violence broke out after a demonstration against the festival that turned deadly.

Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld told The Jerusalem News the demonstrators were throwing rocks and bottles at police and causing injuries.

The event was set to start at 5:30 p.m. in the heart of Tel Aviv, but it was closed after a peaceful protest.

The rioting came amid rising tensions between Israel and the Palestinian Authority over the recent death of a Palestinian teenager, Abd al-Rahim Muhammed Abu Khdeir.

The violence erupted after protesters stormed the Tel Rumeida film festival in the occupied West Bank city of Hebron.

The protests turned violent after protesters took over a cinema that had been damaged during the protest.

Rosenfeld said police responded with water cannons and tear gas, and that two people were detained.

He said two people sustained injuries.

Earlier, hundreds of protesters marched in Tel Aviv from the West Bank town of Hebrons neighborhood, where dozens of people were injured during the protests, and gathered in front of the Israeli Embassy, the Jerusalem Post reported.

A car drove into the embassy, scattering protesters and injuring several people, the Post said.

Rosh Hashanah was observed as part of the Tel Rashid festival, which runs through Wednesday.

It marks the beginning of the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah, the Hebrew New Year, and the festival of Pesach, when the festival is celebrated with traditional foods and wine.

The Tel Aviv Festival was created by the late Israeli filmmaker and director Ariel Levy in the 1980s and is the largest independent film festival.

Levy’s films are known for depicting the complexities of Israeli society, and have drawn audiences worldwide.